Guide to the museums dedicated to Alfred Nobel

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Alfred Nobel, inventor of dynamite, to avoid that everyone remembered as “the merchant of death” (so he wrote an obituary erroneously published when he was still alive), decided to establish a prize, the Nobel precisely, to serve humanity and was seen as one of the most prestigious awards for research in the fields “that help the man to live with dignity”.

alfred nobel museum

Two museums dedicated to him, with thematic exhibitions, many other temporary itinerant, leading the public aware of this figure. Let’s see what they are.

The first is The Nobelmuseet – the Nobel museum that is located in Stockholm, one of the most beautiful eighteenth-century buildings of the Swedish capital, which once housed the stock exchange. The Museum was opened in the spring of 2001, on the centenary of the award and has inside temporary exhibitions, as well as a permanent collection, to let know all the secrets of Nobel.

Here you will find all the info concerning the timetable and the program of the Museum, which has a peculiarity: organize thematic exhibitions arriving throughout the world, to the east as in the west, to spread the work of this man. It will start soon – October 30, 2014 – “The Nobel Prize: Ideas Changing the World”, open until 11 December 2014 and set up in New Delhi, India. Five thematic pavilions to present the man, his work, the establishment of the Prize and its winners.

The second museum center is instead in Karlskoga and also is entirely dedicated to the life of Alfred Nobel. The museum is located in Bjorkborn Manor house, where Nobel built a laboratory, which still exists, in which today’s visitors can observe his scientific work.

Opened in 1970, the museum also has several permanent exhibits, temporary exhibitions and several more detailed reconstruction of his home and his library, as well as many original pieces from his laboratory.