Traveling in a Muslim country during Ramadan

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Are you go to a Muslim country in full Ramadan? Do not worry; your trip will be even more interesting. On condition, nevertheless, to respect the ritual of your guests.

travel during ramadan

Explanation…
Ramadan is a very important ritual for practicing Muslims. It includes in particular period of one month of fasting every day from sunrise to sunset.

What to avoid in public
Driving to have depends on the country. In the Maghreb countries, for example, no specific rule is imposed on tourists. However, be aware that certain attitudes can be misperceived by those who practice Ramadan. Thus, even if nothing obliges you, avoid:

  • Eating or drinking in the street;
  • Smoking in places where there are a lot of people (especially if you’re a woman).

In other countries, such as Saudi Arabia, you do not have a choice: if you do not follow these rules, you may be deported.

Keep your usual…
During this period, the lives of Muslim-majority countries are transformed. Most shops are closed in the afternoon; the restaurants do not serve food to the usual meal times, etc…

If you are not ready with all to mess up, you may find it beneficial to privilege the tourist areas. The restaurants are usually served at meal times. But once again, avoid putting yourself on the terrace. Think a little to those who fast from dawn… Your hotel staff can also provide you what you need or indicate places where to go.

Finally, even in a tourist area, be sure to get organized:

  1. Order to the hotel staff food for the next day;
  2. Make a stock of biscuits, fruit and water;
  3. Eat in your room or out of sight;
  4. Put a bottle with a hose in your bag to drink quietly.

Live with the local tempo
If you want to (or are forced) to live at the pace of the country, do the following:

  • Get up early in the morning to stock the food stalls in the area;
  • Then take your breakfast and tackle the day;
  • Return to the hotel for lunch or improvise a picnic in a secluded spot;
  • Relax during the hottest hours of the afternoon;
  • Dine after the breaking of the fast.

Travel during ramadan is definitely the best time to stay with the locals.