The Rheinturm Dusseldorf, the largest digital clock in the world

share this...Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInDigg thisShare on RedditBuffer this pagePin on PinterestShare on TumblrShare on StumbleUpon

Completed in 1981, then more than 30 years ago, The Rheinturm Dusseldorf (i.e. Rhine Tower, the historic river of Germany, which “starts” with the spectacular waterfalls of Schaffhausen in Switzerland) is a monolithic tower that stands on the profile of city, which in addition to an obvious practical use for broadcasting TV, radio and more, has a playful side.

largest digital clock

The tip of the tower is about 240 meters, while the top floor viable (at least for normal people) is only 174 meters. Not unexpectedly, the tower has a plan for observation, which offers panoramic views of Dusseldorf, 600,000 inhabitants just 40 kilometers away from the beautiful Cologne Cathedral. The Observation Deck is open daily from 10 am until 11:30 pm.

The tower also houses a bar, ‘The M 168’ which claims to be the highest bar in all of Germany, and a restaurant with 180 seats, which revolves on its axis, but in opposite directions in the morning and the afternoon, than in the evening. Curiosity: For reasons of space, the kitchen is in the basement of the base of the tower and is connected to the restaurant via a dedicated elevator.

But the Rheinturm Dusseldorf can not boast of being the tallest building in Germany, that title belongs to the TV tower in Berlin (368 meters high). But it can boast of being the largest digital clock in the world; but on condition of being able to read.

In fact, the “stem” of the Tower is divided into three parts by two rings of red lights, with the top section to count the hours, the middle section to count the minutes, and the lowest level to count the seconds. But do not look for numbers, but only points of light to be counted.